Infinity Week Part 2

So thinking about the infinite has been an interesting activity for me. It’s definitely true that none of us human beings can really conceptualize the enormity of something that’s infinite, so I’ve been left wondering what exactly we mean when we represent something infinite. I’ve concluded that what we tend to mean is something that’s repeated in a seemingly endless loop. In the classic “Infinity Shot”, two mirrors are used to created just this sort of repetition.

As I did here with my $2 art from Nuit Blanche in Toronto, twine, and a paper clip.

 

Interestingly enough, while simple repetition seems to lure us with an easy representation of the infinite, there’s some pretty interesting math which suggests this isn’t entirely wrong. When you consider fractal geometry, at its core is a series of repeating patterns, where the whole can be found in any given part.

I know it’s not fractal, but that’s what I was thinking about when I was shooting this pattern of leaves.

I don’t even need to pretend to be smart enough to understand fractal math (I’m not) to find another example of the relationship between infinity and repetition. Repeating, non-terminating decimals are encountered much more frequently than Non-repeating decimals. It may be true that things which run long enough, inevitably repeat (although how much more interesting are numbers like Pi for that then?)

Anyway, enough pretending I know about math. Here are a few more pictures I took today while thinking about repetition and infinity.

I was hoping to find the sort of equi-distant, planned forest arrangement you often see along the side of the road, but these three trees were the most aligned, most similar I found.

All these trees seemed very similar to me, though I don’t think I captured anything that really represents repetition or infinity here. I like the image though.

Millions of iterations, countless in their forest population. Still, just pine needles.

 

 

 

 

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One response to “Infinity Week Part 2

  1. Pingback: Do infinities exist in nature? | plus.maths.org | Computers & Science on the Net

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